Jill Stukenberg

Jill Stukenberg's picture

Jill Stukenberg

Associate Professor
English

RM 323

jill.stukenberg@uwc.edu
(715) 261-6277
Statement 
Jill Stukenberg will be the upcoming UW Marathon County Distinguished Faculty Society honoree. Her project involves work on a novel developed from a short story published in Midwestern Gothic in 2016. She was also the UW Colleges 2016-2017 Wisconsin Teaching Fellow. Stukenberg approaches teaching as a scholar, and recently presented at the Fall 2017 Creative Writing Studies Organization conference in North Carolina on "Rethinking Inspiration in Introductory Creative Writing."
Publications 
Scholarly
  • Stukenberg, Jill. “Deep Habits: The Workshop as Critique in Creative Writing” Arts & Humanities in Higher Education, special issue “Critique as Signature Pedagogy,” edited by Nancy Chick and Phillip Motley, July 2016, ahh.sagepub.com, DOI: 10.1177/147402216652770
  • Anderson, Kristine Rae, Jeffrey Becker, Mary Cantrell, Phoebe Reeves, and Jill Stukenberg. “Diggers in the Garden: The Habits of Mind of Creative Writers in Basic Writing Classrooms. Teaching English in the Two-Year College, vol. 42, no. 2, December 2014, pp. 161-171.
Creative work
Presentation Topics
  • Creative Writing Workshops for All Age and Skill Levels. Workshops might focus on: image, sensory details, compelling characters, point of view; or genre types: poetry, short story, creative nonfiction, short plays. Also: How to read and understand poetry, Ways to approach revision, Mining life for material.
  • Brainstorming Sessions. Facilitate sessions to help your group come up with new approaches, paper topic ideas, or solutions to problems. Sessions can also promote group cohesion or out-of-the-box thinking, or simply help participants think in general about their own creativity and ability to think divergently.
  • Evaluating Websites: How to judge the credibility of what you find online.
  • Writing Introductions and Conclusions to Academic Essays.
  • Punctuation Primer: When and how to use commas, dashes, semi-colons, and colons and for what effects in writing.
  • Judging. Writing, art, debate, pie-eating. (I may be able to serve as a judge or help create a rubric (criteria) for use in judging.)